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Deadly Drug

December 8, 2013
Times Leader

KROKODIL is pronounced crocodile, but a person might be safer when encountering the reptile than using krokodil, described online by Time as "The World's Deadliest Drug."

Its proper name is desomorphine, but it also has been termed as a flesh-eating "zombie" drug. Its street name is based on a Russian word, and it has been used in that country for more than a decade. It reportedly surfaced in the United States this fall, according to news reports.

Even more recently, there have been reports of the deadly drug in Athens and Columbus, according to The Columbus Dispatch.

One law enforcement officer in Ohio said a woman bought krokodil in Columbus with the belief that it was heroin.

In some areas, law enforcement officers report they won't file charges against persons who surrender krokodil at their offices.

Among the drug's side effects are that the skin can resemble a crocodile, and it can cause brain damage. The flesh on some parts of the body affected by krokodil injections can rot off, leaving bare bone.

The Drug Enforcement Administration reports the skin of long-time abusers of this drug may appear "as greenish and scaly due to damaged blood vessels, thrombosis and damaged soft tissues surrounding the injection sites. The skin's appearance is similar to a crocodile's scaled and rugged skin. The skin injuries can eventually develop into severe tissue damage leading to thrombophlebitis and gangrene. These conditions usually result in limb amputation or sometimes death."

Some report the life expectancy of an addict is two years or possibly three. Considering its side effects, those wouldn't be pleasant years.

Unfortunately, it's possible to make this injectable drug at home, and it's less expensive than heroin but is more toxic. Some of its ingredients such a paint thinner and gasoline sound horrible.

Forbes magazine in late November reported that the DEA has been "acquiring samples alleged to contain desomorphine, interviewing drug abusers, and monitoring intelligence reports. To date, none of our forensic laboratories has analysed an exhibit found to contain desomorphine. A sample sent to our Chicago forensic laboratory that was suspected to be krokodil was actually heroin."

Other news sources report it seems to be in this country.

If it is, stay farther away from it than you would from a crocodile.

 
 

 

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